Record

Reference numberJBO/1/32
Alternative reference numberJBO/1/21
LevelItem
TitleMinutes of an ordinary meeting of the Royal Society
Date13 June 1661
DescriptionDr Charleton gave three grains of nux vomica to a young thrush, and as much to a young woodpecker, who had convulsions about two hours before they died. He gave also to another young thrush two grains of nux vomica, and as much Sublimat mixed together, and that killed the bird in 9 minutes

Colonell Tuke brought in the history of the rained seeds, and some ivy berries, whose kernell are the same, which were reported to have fallen down from heaven in Warwick shire and Shropshire .

Dr Charleton asked to provide two male vipers against next day, and to bring in his account concerning poison.

Mr Wilde desired to shew the experiment of the stone kindled by wetting.

Dr Henshaw desired to procure the like experiment, and also the history of Mechanicks.

That the 'Experiment of the Cupping glasse and lighted Candles' be made next day.

Sir William Persall asked to make his vitriol experiment.

The Dyving Engine to go forward with all speed, and the Treasurer to procure the lead and moneys for the remainder.

This sympathetick powder to be brought in next day.

Dr Scarburgh asked to bring in his account of Echos, Mr Rooke the Satellites of Jupiter and the Heights of the Atmosphere, and Dr Wilkins the Filtrations.

Mr Pope asked to procure the 'Experiment of the breaking of Pebbles' with the hand.

The last days orders to be read next day.

Dr Charleton presented the Society with his book of 'Exercitationes Pathologicae'.

Mr Oldenburg brought in an account of Monsieur Morins 'Booke of Insects'.
Extent2p
FormatManuscript
Access statusOpen
URL descriptionDigital version available on The Royal Society Turning the Pages
URLhttps://ttp.royalsociety.org/ttp/ttp.html?id=a2ca205b-6e3e-45b4-83a3-d1624ab33b5e&type=book&_ga=2.105905027.1616411845.1644832495-1539009595.1644832495
Add to My Items

    Collection highlights

    Browse the records of some of our collections, which cover all branches of science and date from the 12th century onwards. These include the published works of Fellows of the Royal Society, personal papers of eminent scientists, letters and manuscripts sent to the Society or presented at meetings, and administrative records documenting the Society's activities since our foundation in 1660.

    The Royal Society

    The Royal Society is a Fellowship of many of
    the world's most eminent scientists and is the
    oldest scientific academy in continuous existence.
    Registered charity number 207043

    Website design ©CalmView



    CONTACT US

    + 44 207 451 2500
    (Lines open Mon-Fri, 9:00-17:00. Excludes bank holidays)

    6-9 Carlton House Terrace, London SW1Y 5AG

    Email Us →

    SUBSCRIBE

    Subscribe to our newsletters to be updated with the
    latest news on innovation, events, articles and reports.

    Subscribe →

    © CalmView