Record

Reference numberMS/119/2/87
LevelItem
TitleLetter from Frederick Marow Eardley-Wilmot, Cape of Good Hope Observatory to Humphrey Lloyd, Trinity College, Dublin
Date18 March 1842
DescriptionEardley-Wilmot comments on the excellent operation of the vertical force instrument and decrease in the time. Last month there were changes to the new mean position of the horizontal magnetometer, and the time of vibrations of the deflecting bar. Discussion on the effect this has on the dip. Eardley-Wilmot recounts the difficulty he faced last year by the great increase of intensity. Mistakes made regarding the vertical force, having the time of vibration in the wrong plane. Eardley-Wilmot informs Lloyd of the numerical value for T. Eardley-Wilmot’s reasons for wanting a shorter interval in the term day.

Discussion on the weekly term days, twice a week intensities, dips four times a week. Eardley-Wilmot inquires to see the results of the weekly dips from Dublin.

Discussion on [Lieutenant Henry Clerk's] quarters, and Eardley-Wilmot’s hopes to get a place built in the auxiliary rather than a house, using his own means. Includes a simple diagram of the building from the observatory. [Clerk's] and Eardley-Wilmot have been using the forms provided by Lloyd for their term day. Eardley-Wilmot notes that he cannot find the effects that the ‘foreign people’ about the currents of air, insisting that the greatest deflections are on still calm days. Eardley-Wilmot expresses frustration at the anemometer, saying he wishes ‘it had blown into the sea’.

Eardley-Wilmot enquires after the bulbs he sent Lloyd, and intends to send Lloyd seeds he is collecting.
Extent4p
FormatManuscript
Physical descriptionInk on paper
Access statusOpen
Fellows associated with this archive
CodeNameDates
NA6061Eardley-Wilmot; Frederick Marow (1812 - 1877)1812 - 1877
NA8252Lloyd; Humphrey (1800 - 1881)1800 - 1881
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