Record

Reference numberRR/16/92
LevelItem
TitleReferee's report by Charles Chree, on a paper 'Some experiments in magnetism' by T C Porter
DateNovember 1903
DescriptionSectional Committee: [Physics and Chemistry]

No clear statement regarding publication. Notes the paper deals with two distinct subjects. The first four pages deal with the action or absence of action of powerful magnetic fields on the growth and orientation of crystals. Experience seems to have convinced the author that in the majority of instances the results observed were not due to the magnetic field. The photographs showing the small crystals help to explain Porter's remarks but would hardly assist the reader to form a judgement for himself and the paper does not go into details which would be of much service to anyone else repeating the experiments. Imagines the author's object with this paper was to put his results on record with the hope that he may find time in the future to carry the investigation to a definite conclusion. Details three criticisms of this section of the paper. The second part of Porter's paper, pages five to ten, deals with the artificial production of magnets in several ways. Chree is not sure that this can be regarded as altogether novel. It is well known that even the earth's field suffices to magnetise bricks when cooling. Folgheraiter has written a lot on this subject in the 'Atti Acc. Lincei'. On page six Porter gives some rather remarkable data as to difference in density of sulphide tubes according to whether they were or were not in a strong magnetic field when 'fired'. Thinks it desirable such data should be confirmed before any publication of figures. Later experiments relate to magnets formed from a magnetic oxide in a shallow groove on a charcoal block. These experiments are interesting in their way but the author does not seem to deduce from them any novel principles though they might present points of interest to chemists which do not suggest themselves to a physicist. The general impression the paper leaves is that nothing is worked out and that a variety of half finished results are presented whose ultimate value remains to be seen.

[Published in Proceedings of the Royal Society, 1904].

Endorsed on verso as received 17 November 1903.
Extent4p
FormatManuscript
Physical descriptionLetter on paper
Access statusOpen
Related materialDOI: 10.1098/rspl.1904.0003 Vol.73 1904
Fellows associated with this archive
CodeNameDates
NA1735Chree; Charles (1860 - 1928)1860 - 1928
Add to My Items

    Collection highlights

    Browse the records of some of our collections, which cover all branches of science and date from the 12th century onwards. These include the published works of Fellows of the Royal Society, personal papers of eminent scientists, letters and manuscripts sent to the Society or presented at meetings, and administrative records documenting the Society's activities since our foundation in 1660.

    The Royal Society

    The Royal Society is a Fellowship of many of
    the world's most eminent scientists and is the
    oldest scientific academy in continuous existence.
    Registered charity number 207043

    Website design ©CalmView



    CONTACT US

    + 44 207 451 2500
    (Lines open Mon-Fri, 9:00-17:00. Excludes bank holidays)

    6-9 Carlton House Terrace, London SW1Y 5AG

    Email Us →

    SUBSCRIBE

    Subscribe to our newsletters to be updated with the
    latest news on innovation, events, articles and reports.

    Subscribe →

    © CalmView